Faculty Directory

Dr. Muthanna H. Al-Dahhan

Professor, Department Chair

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 1979, University of Baghdad
  • MS ChE 1988, Oregon State University
  • PhD ChE 1993, Washington University in St. Louis

‌Reactor Engineering; Transport-Kinetic Integration; Advanced Measurement and Computational Techniques


Dr. Dipak Barua

Assistant Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 2002, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
  • PhD ChE 2008, North Carolina State University

Computational and Systems Biology, Modeling and simulation of cell signal transduction systems, Immunity and cancer, Distributed and parallel computing in systems biology applications.

My research is focused on applying computational and sytems biology approaches to address problems in biology and medicine. I work on cell signal transduction systems relevant for immunity and cancer. One of my key research interests is to understand B lymphocyte (B cell) function. I study the mechanisms by which antigen-recognition activates B cells, and determine cell fate decisions. My research related to cancer cell systems is focused on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling and autophagy. My other area of interest is to develop parallel and distributed computing approaches for multiscale modeling.


Dr. Sutapa Barua

Assistant Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 2003, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
  • MS ChE 2007, Montana State University
  • PhD ChE 2011, Arizona State University

Engineering nanoparticles for drug delivery, Designing polymers for diagnosis of cancer early, and Fabricating micropatricles for regenerative therapy.

The overall goal of our research is to expand the knowledge of engineering to the field of biomedical research to help solve problems in improving public health. Our research focuses on three major areas:

  1. Engineering drug delivery systems using biomaterials, and understanding their transport behavior in target tissues

  2. Designing polymeric imaging agents to detect cancer at the early stage, as opposed to diagnose the disease at the late stage

Fabricating microparticle cushions for wound healing


Dr. Daniel Forciniti

Professor, Associate Chairman

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS Chem 1979, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • MS ChE 1984, University of the South, Argentina
  • PhD ChE 1991, North Carolina State University

Molecular simulations of biological molecules at liquid/solid interfaces, light and neutron scattering of biological molecules, the molecular basis of disease, purification of miomacromolecules

Peptide and proteins at interfaces: The main focus of our current research efforts in this area is the study of peptides at solid/liquid interfaces.  Both experimental and theoretical approaches are pursed in our group.  The use of dynamic and static light scattering for the study of proteins and tailored peptides in solution is routine in our laboratory.  This work is supplemented by neutron diffraction and neutron reflectivity studies performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  The experimental work is supported (and interpreted) by using atomic level molecular simulations.  We are currently focusing our efforts on the study of surface-induced polypeptide aggregation.  This work is aimed at the understanding of the formation of amyloid deposits.

Purification of biomacromolecules:  The focus of our current research in this area is the study of the effect of glycosylation on the stability of monoclonal antibodies and other proteins.  A key component of our work is the experimental determination of second virial coefficients and their interpretations using statistical thermodynamics to quantify the effect of glycan groups on the potential of mean force of biomacromolecules.


Dr. Xinhua Liang

Assistant Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Personal Website:

Education:

  • BS ChE 2001, Tianjin University
  • MS ChE 2003, Tianjin University
  • PhD ChE 2008, University of Colorado at Boulder

Surface science and catalysis, Nanostructured films and devices, Energy and environmental applications

Our research focuses on rational and directed design of nanostructured materials for efficient reactions and separations technologies. Atomic/Molecular Layer Deposition (ALD/MLD) thin film coating technique will be used for this research program. ALD/MLD is a thin film growth technique based on sequential, self-limiting surface chemical reactions and allows for precise deposition of ultra-thin, highly conformal coatings over complex 3D topography structures, with excellent control over stoichiometry and properties. The value in applying this thin film coating technology is to enable to harness the unexpected phenomena that result from the changes in structure and chemistry which occur over atomic scales at surfaces or interfaces. The second value is that the user of the material (particle or film) can save cost by using less of the most expensive substrate on the surface where the function of the material substrate is most critical.


Dr. Athanasios Liapis

Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Research Interests:

Transport Phenomena; Adsorption/Desorption; Fundamentals and Processes; Bioseparations; Chromatographic Separations; Capillary Electrochromatography; Chemical Reaction Engineering; Lyophilization

Education:

  • BS ChE 1972, New York University
  • MS ChE 1974, University of Rochester
  • PhD ChE 1977, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule,Zürich, Swizerland

Dr. Douglas Ludlow

Professor, Director of Freshman Engineering Program

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Research Interests:

Surface Characterization of Adsorbents and Catalysts; Applications of Fractal Geometry to Surface Morphology

Education:

  • BS ChE 1982, Brigham Young University
  • PhD ChE 1986, Arizona State University

Dr. Christi Patton Luks

Associate Teaching Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Research Interests:

Engineering Education Pedagogies; Sustainable Solutions to Practical Problems

Education:

  • BS ChE 1981, Texas A&M University,
  • MS Applied Math 1988, University of Tulsa
  • PhD ChE 1993, University of Tulsa

Dr. Parthasakha Neogi

Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 1973, Indian Institute of Technology
  • MS ChE 1975, Indian Institute of Technology
  • PhD ChE 1979, Carnegie-Mellon University
 

Interfacial transport phenomena - dynamic contact angles, solubilization kinetics, electrodeposition

The area of research is interfacial phenomena with emphasis on non-equilibrium effects.  Fluid mechanics of a liquid displacing another fluid on a solid surface (“wetting kinetics”) shows that all stresses are infinite at the contact line.  Removal of this singularity requires the use of a reasonable slip velocity and slip velocity has been used to obtain the rates of movement of the leading edge (“contact line”) in a variety of problems over years.  These cases where the liquid spreads on its own, and at very low speeds, are called spontaneous spreading.  At present time the case of forced spreading is being analyzed.  Another area of research is that of mass transfer in surfactant systems.  Typical one key component of detergency is that of solubilization where water insoluble oils are included into the surfactant micelles.  Investigations into kinetics of solubilization also takes one into the kinetics of the contact line above.


Dr. Joontaek Park

Assistant Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS Chem. Tech. 1996, Seoul National University, Korea
  • MS ChE 1998, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology
  • PhD ChE 2009, University of Florida

Dynamics and Rheology of Complex Fluids/Soft Matters

Dr. Park’s research interests include 1) studies of the dynamics and rheology of nanoparticle-containing Newtonian/non-Newtonian liquids and 2) the development of new computational stochastic models for biopolymer networks. Theoretical as well as numerical analysis/modeling will be performed to generalize the behaviors of biopolymer networks and nanoparticle-complex fluids systems and give insights which are important in designing processes for biomedical as well as energy applications.


Dr. Fateme Rezaei

Assistant Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Personal Website:

Education:

  • BS ChE 2004, Shiraz University
  • PhD ChE 2011, Monash University, Australia and Lulea University of Technology, Sweden

Adsorption, Energy Efficient Separation Processes, Process Design, Modeling and Optimization

Our research focus broadly lies at the interface of chemical, materials science and environmental engineering, where the general goal of our work is to develop advanced materials and processes for clean energy and sustainable chemical processes. In particular, our research relates to fundamental and applied aspects of adsorption, separations, purification and reaction. The research activities include: 1) structured adsorbents in gas separation processes; 2) modeling and simulation of cyclic separation processes such as PSA, TSA, VSA; 3) development of hybrid materials for separation, purification and reaction applications; 4) liquid phase adsorptive separation and purification.


Dr. Ali Rownaghi

Assistant Research Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS Chemistry 2001, University of Mashhad
  • MS Catalysis 2004, University of Tehran
  • PhD Catalysis 2008, University Putra

Catalysis and Reaction Engineering, Membrane Gas Separations, Mixed Matrix Membranes for In-situ Reaction and Separation, Carbon Capture and Utilizations, Hybrid Energy Systems

Our primary focus is on creating, understanding, and rationally engineering advanced materials for catalysis, membrane and adsorption applications through innovative and scalable processing strategies. In particular, our research activities include: (1) Sustainable Energy (Upgrading of biomass and natural gas; Biofuels; CO2 capture and utilization; Waste-plastics recycling), (2) Catalysis (Heterogeneous catalysts such as zeolites, supported metals, noble metals and mixed metal oxides; Selective oxidation, hydrogenation, and dehydration; High temperature-high pressure reactions; membrane reactors), (3) Separations (Metal organic framework mixed matrix membranes and adsorbents; Composite hollow fiber membranes for in-situ reaction and separation).


Dr. Peter Ryan

Associate Professor of Engineering Practice

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Research Interests:

Education:

  • BS Chemistry 1983, University of Lowell
  • MS Paper Technology 1985, Institute of Paper Chemistry
  • PhD ChE 1989, University of Massachusetts
  • PhD Dissertation: Design, Optimization and Control of Heterogeneous Azeotropic Distillation Sequences

Process Optimization, Data Analysis

Dr. Ryan joined the faculty team at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in August of 2016, after working as a practicing engineer in industry for 27 years.  Dr. Ryan began his career in 1989 working for Bayer as a process control project engineer, initially at the Central Engineering offices in Pittsburgh, and then as a project engineer at the Bayer Baytown site.  In 1996 Dr. Ryan transferred to the Bayer AG Central Engineering offices in Leverkusen, Germany.  At Bayer AG, Dr. Ryan worked as a process engineer developing dynamic and steady-state simulations of the processes operated by Bayer.


Dr. Oliver Sitton

Associate Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Research Interests:

Bioengineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 1975, University of Missouri-Rolla
  • MS ChE 1976, University of Missouri-Rolla
  • PhD ChE 1979, University of Missouri-Rolla

Dr. Joseph Smith

Laufer Endowed Energy Chair Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 1983, Brigham Young University
  • MS ChE 1984, Brigham Young University
  • PhD ChE 1990, Brigham Young University

Hybrid energy systems, Fuels combustion and gasification, Industrial gas flare design, operation, and regulation, Process modeling, monitoring, control, and operation

Dr. Joseph D. Smith currently holds the Laufer Endowed Energy Chair and also serves as Director of the Energy Research and Development Center at Missouri University of Science and Technology.  He has been developing hybrid energy systems that integrate nuclear energy with chemical and petrochemical processes to produce liquid fuels and chemicals.  Clean carbon free nuclear heat is used with high temperature steam electrolysis to replaces traditional steam methane reforming.  Hybrid Energy Systems represent transformational energy technology that supports national energy security.


Dr. Jee-Ching Wang

Associate Professor

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Education:

  • BS ChE 1988, National Taiwan University
  • MS ChE 1990, National Taiwan University
  • PhD ChE 1998, The Pennsylvania State University

Composite Nanoparticles, Complex Fluids, Porous Media, Food Engineering, Biomolecular Transport and adsorption, Molecular Modeling and Simulation Methodologies

Dr. Wang’s research interests and activities are centered around molecular modeling and simulations of systems with complex structures and dynamics.  The essence of this relatively new approach is to study various properties through atomistically constructed model systems, computer simulations, and statistical mechanics.  It is particularly beneficial for complementing conventional methods to study multiscale systems with microstructures and interfaces.  Our current applications include nanoparticle self-assembly, complex nanoconfined fluids, and transport and adsorption of biomolecules in porous media or on a surface.  We are also interested in devising new algorithms to expand the capabilities of molecular modeling and molecular simulation.